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CORYMBIA terminalis syn. Eucalyptus terminalis

OUT OF STOCK

Desert Bloodwood

Other names: Bush Coconut

Family: Myrtaceae

Subfamily: Myrtoideae

Characteristics: Tree to 12 m spread 3 m

Seeds per packet: 15

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The Desert Bloodwood is long-lived tree, large specimens can reach 15 metres in height but are more commonly 8–10 metres, and are likely to live several hundred years.

Produces yellow and white flowers in the cooler months from April to October. The drops of nectar in each flower provide a high energy drink for many desert animals including honey-eaters, insects and possums.

The Desert Bloodwood tree is host to an unusual female insect called a coccid. She has no legs, wings or antennae and never leaves her gall. Hidden away, she spends her life sucking sap out of the trees veins. The gall that grows on the tree is the coconut, once you have collect the coconut it must be broken open, the insect on the inside is what you eat, the grub contains a lot of moisture and a disinfectant, it is still eaten today.

Endemic to Western Australia, South West Queensland, Northern New South Wales and the Northern Territory.

Adaptable to a range well-drained soils, drought and frost tolerant.

Note: Corymbia terminalis is one of around 80 eucalyptus which were transferred in 1995 from the genus Eucalyptus to the newly created genus Corymbia. The species was formerly known as Eucalyptus terminalis.

Please Note: Although many of the traditional Bush Food and Medicine plants are now commercially produced in various forms we recommend you re-search these before using them as any form of food or medicines. Some parts of the plant may not be edible or some may need prepared before they are safe to eat or use in any way. We do our best to describe their traditional & modern uses. It is the purchaser responsibility to ensure they are fit for their intended use.

Eucalypt's germinate readily from seed and are generally considered one of the easiest natives to grow from seed.

Depending on the species Eucalyptus seed comes in various sizes from very fine to several millimetres long. As a rule of thumb seed that is fine should be sown on the surface of a porous mix and not buried. Seed 1 to 2 mm in diameter can be covered very lightly and seed from 2 mm up can be sown to a depth of the seed width.

Although seed can be sown most of the year in Australia seed is generally best sown in spring or autumn in temperate climates, avoid the coldest and hottest months of the year. The optimum germination temperature for germination is around 18-22°C

  1. Sow seed on surface of a porous seed raising mix. The seed will lodge in the the pores of the mix once watered.
  2. Sprinkle a very light covering of the seed raising mix over the seed if required to hold the seed in place. Do not bury seed deeply.
  3. Water with fine mist spray to avoid disturbance of the seed.
  4. Place in a warm shaded or semi shaded position to avoid dying out.
  5. Keep warm & moist, avoid drying out or waterlogging the growing mix.
  6. Germination generally occurs in around 10-28 days in the right condition.

General note: Seeds of many natives are dormant and require specific conditions or pre-treatment for germination.
Do not be too hasty to discard seed that does not germinate, seeds will often lay dormant until the conditions are similar to their natural requirements for germination to occur. Containers put to one side will often surprise long after they were discarded.


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